Data

ETHNIC POWER RELATIONS DATA SET, Version 3 (1946-2010)

Ethnic Power Relations (EPR) Version 3 identifies all politically relevant ethnic groups and their access to state power in every country of the world from 1946 to 2010. It includes annual data on almost 800 groups and codes the degree to which their representatives hold executive-level state power — from total control of the government to overt political discrimination. Version 3 includes a new coding of type of ethnic marker distinguishing group members (religion, language, race, etc.). The last update of Version 3 occured on Dec 31 2014.

Please cite the following article when making reference to EPR data: Andreas Wimmer, Lars-Erik Cederman and Brian Min. "Ethnic politics and armed conflict. A configurational analysis of a new global dataset", in American Sociological Review 74(2):316-337, 2009.

 

To specifically cite the ethnic marker data available in EPR 3, please cite Andreas Wimmer. 2015. "Race-centrism. A critique and a research agenda", in Ethnic and Racial Studies 38(13): 2186-2205, 2015.

  • Country-year format (includes basic control variables) (zipped Stata file)

  • Do-file for Wimmer, Cederman, Min (2009) (RTF file)

  • Group-year format (includes basic control variables) (zipped Stata file)

  • Group-period format (Excel)

  • GeoEPR in a zipped folder (zipped Stata file)

  • Coding rules for power status (PDF)

  • Coding rules for types of ethnic markers (PDF)

FROM EMPIRE TO NATION-STATE (REPLICATION DATA)

Takes fixed geographical territories instead of countries as units of analysis, enabling the tracing of a territory’s political and economic development before and after independence from 1816 to 2001. 

 

 

This is the replication dataset for Wimmer and Min. “From empire to nation-state: Explaining war in the modern world, 1816-2001”, American Sociological Review 71(6):867-897, 2006.

NATION-STATE FORMATION ACROSS THE WORLD (REPLICATION DATA)

Contains variables indicating economic, political, and cultural modernization processes on the world's territories before they transition to the nation-state, the presence of nationalist organizations, wars, dependency from imperal centers, the power of these centers, the years in which a territory transitions to the nation-state, etc. It covers 140 territories (in their post-independence geographic extension) and years from 1816 onward.

 

  • Zipped Stata file

  • Data sources (PDF)

  • Do-file to replicate Wimmer and Feinstein 2010 (RTX)

 

This is the replication dataset for Wimmer and Feinstein. 2010. "The rise of the nation-state across the world, 1816-2001", in American Sociological Review 75(5):764-790

ETHNIC ARMED CONFLICT, VERSION 3  

A recoding of the PRIO/Uppsala Armed Conflicts Data Set to identify ethnic and secessionist conflicts. The Ethnic Armed Conflict dataset is compatible with the EPR Version 3 dataset and is integrated in the EPR stata files.

NATIONAL PRIDE AND ETHNOPOLITICAL POWER (REPLICATION DATA)  

This dataset combines representative survey data from 123 countries around the world and records responses to an identical question: "How proud are you to be of XY nationality"? The dataset also contains information, for a reduced sample of 64 countries, on the ethnic background of individuals, using EPR's group list and power status variables. 

 

  • Zipped Stata file

  • Do-file to replicate Wimmer 2017 (RTX)

 

This is the replication dataset for Wimmer. “Power and pride. National identity and ethnopolitical inequality around the world", in World Politics 69(4):605-639, 2017.

WARS BY LOCATION AND PURPOSE 

Identifies the location and purpose of all 464 major wars since 1816, expanding substantially on previous efforts by including wars fought in all polities, including pre-independent kingdoms and empires. The data complements standard war datasets that characterize wars only by the state participants that fight them. Compatible with the From Empire to Nation-state dataset.

 

The dataset and coding rules are described in Wimmer and Min. “The location and purpose of wars around the world, 1816-2001", in International Interactions 35(4):390-417, 2009.